My quarantine book

Neither Tolstoy’s War and Peace nor James Joyce’s Ulysses would be my quarantine book. I immediately remembered the story of how a young boy found love in the concentration camp of Terezín.

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The Veda and Voltaire

Does everything really happen for the best? I snarl, as Voltaire most probably did, challenging Leibniz with comedy and wisdom amid a world of atrocities.

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The Bhagavadgita | e-book

It is with great pleasure I announce the e-book version of my translation of the Bhagavadgita by Padma Shri award-winning author and Vedanta teacher, Gloria Arieira

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Book review: Albert Camus’s “L’Etranger”

The Outsider? The Foreigner? The Stranger? One would expect more consensus regarding the translation of the title work of a Nobel prize-winning author. However, just the title of Albert Camus’s 1942 classic novel, L’Etranger, provokes reflection, as does every page of his terse prose

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Book review: “The Maze” by Panos Karnezis

  More than its reviews, it was the novel’s setting just after the Greco-Turkish War (1919-1922) — in which a remaining and lost Greek regiment wandered the deserts of Anatolia to find the sea — that sparked my curiosity to read Panos Karnezis’s, The Maze. Sebastian Faulk’s Birdsong and A.S. Byatt’s The Children’s Story are […]

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Book review: “Ema, the Captive” by César Aira

Argentina, 1800s. A nubile captive, together with her infant child, are government prisoners, taken on long caravan as part of the supplies needed at the military outpost of a sinister colonial world deprived of women. It is just the beginning of the adventurous captivity of Ema, a “white” woman of unknown origins who is bartered […]

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Book review: “El llano en llamas” (the Burning Plain and other stories) by Juan Rulfo

Framing the context of the Rulfo’s work, my nephew could help but to ignite interest: “No te olvides que la Revolución Mexicana sucedió antes de la Rusa, ¿eh?” he said, reminding me of the global significance of the violent land and agrarian reform that was the Mexican Revolution, which happened even before that of the momentous Russian one that changed the course of history for the world.

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Two sides of fiction, one road to empathy

His choice surprised me not only because both of us spend our time reading the Booker prize shortlists. I couldn’t imagine someone like him taking time out to read Harry Potter— which, I discovered, revealed much more about my prejudice than about his taste.

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